10th Grade English | Reading as Resistance: <em>Reading Lolita in Tehran</em> | Free Lesson Plans (2024)

Table of Contents
Unit Summary Texts and Materials Core Materials Supporting Materials Assessment Key Knowledge Intellectual Prep Essential Questions Vocabulary Notes for Teachers Lesson Map Common Core Standards Core Standards Language Standards Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Supporting Standards Language Standards Language Standards Language Standards Language Standards Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards

Unit Summary

Sophom*ore year concludes with Reading Lolita in Tehran, a memoir about Azar Nafisi's experience living and teaching in the Islamic Republic of Iran during and after the Iranian Revolution of 1979. Throughout sophom*ore year, students have explored the theme of the individual in society in fictional texts; with Nafisi's memoir—which combines personal experience, literary analysis, and historical context—they examine the very real ways that Nafisi and her students navigate their lives while living under an oppressive regime that aims to strip them of all individuality.

At the start of the unit, students will work in groups to conduct research on a certain aspect of Iranian culture, building their knowledge about the setting of the memoir. While reading the text, students will trace the role of fiction in the lives of Nafisi and her students and the ways in which reading fiction can be a powerful act of resistance. Students will also analyze Nafisi's structure and style—such as her decision to construct her memoir nonlinearly and her use of second person as a narrative technique—and the impact of those choices on her reader. Other nonfiction texts as well as poetry are incorporated in the unit to further explore the memoir's themes and/or provide an additional perspective on the questions Nafisi raises in her memoir.

As students read, they will also imitate Nafisi's use of vivid details and sensory imagery in their own shorter narrative writing exercises within the unit. For the unit's performance task, students will apply those skills, crafting their own personal narratives in which they describe a significant moment in their lives, drawing inspiration from Nafisi.

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10th Grade English | Reading as Resistance: <em>Reading Lolita in Tehran</em> | Free Lesson Plans (1)

Texts and Materials

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Core Materials

Supporting Materials

Purchase Books

Assessment

This assessment accompanies Unit 16 and should begiven on the suggested assessment day or after completing theunit.

  • Download Socratic Seminar

  • Download Performance Task

Key Knowledge

Intellectual Prep

Suggestions for how to prepare to teach this unit

Unit Launch

Before you teach this unit, unpack the texts, themes, and core standards through our guided intellectual preparation process. Each Unit Launch includes a series of short videos, targeted readings, and opportunities for action planning to ensure you're prepared to support every student.

Essential Questions

The central thematic questions addressed in the unit or across units

  • What is the purpose of fiction?
  • What different forms of resistance can individuals display in the face of oppression?
  • What particular choices of diction, imagery, and structure do writers use to persuade and move readers?

Vocabulary

Literary terms, text-based vocabulary, idioms and word parts to be taught with the text

Text-based

arbitraryassentcomplicitcomplydissentideologyillicitimmutableinsubordinationindignityinimitableordealsubversivenesstheocracytotalitariantransgressionvehemence

Literary Terms

allusiondictionextended metaphorforeshadowinglogical fallacymemoirmoodtone

To see all the vocabulary for Unit 5, view our 10th Grade Vocabulary Glossary.

Notes for Teachers

Notes to help teachers prepare for this specific unit

Your students will undoubtedly come into your classroom with some preconceptions—and possibly misconceptions—about the Middle East in general and Islam in particular. It is essential that discussions around these topics remain respectful and based in fact. Nafisi argues in her memoir that the way the Iranian government has used Islam as a political tool and method of social control is not an accurate representation of the religion. At times, she refers to some Muslims as "fanatical" or "fundamentalist"; it is important for students to understand that Nafisi is using these terms to describe certain individuals who have a strict interpretation of how one should live as a Muslim; she is by no means suggesting that all Muslims have fanatical beliefs and fundamental interpretations of Islamist teachings. Just like any other religion, there is enormous diversity within the Islamic world about how the religion should be practiced in daily life and how religious law should be applied.

In Lesson 4, students are given a brief introduction to the core beliefs and Five Pillars of Islam. Below are additional texts and resources to consider before teaching this unit and/or to provide for students in order to give more background information that will hopefully address some of the stereotypes and misconceptions about the religion.

Lesson Map

Reading Lolita in Tehran — pp. 81–96

Analyze how and why Nafisi uses flashbacks to structure her memoir.

RI.9-10.3RI.9-10.4RI.9-10.5

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Common Core Standards

Core Standards

The content standards covered in this unit

L.9-10.5

Language Standards

L.9-10.5— Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

RI.9-10.2

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.2— Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.3

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.3— Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

RI.9-10.4

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.4— Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

RI.9-10.5

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.5— Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RI.9-10.6

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.6— Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

RI.9-10.8

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.8— Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

RI.9-10.10

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.10— By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.<br />By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 9—10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

RL.9-10.2

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.2— Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RL.9-10.4

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.4— Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

SL.9-10.1

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1— Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9—10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.a

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.a— Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.b

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.b— Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.c

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.c— Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.d

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.d— Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

SL.9-10.4

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.4— Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

SL.9-10.5

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.5— Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

W.9-10.2

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2— Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2.a

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2.a— Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.9-10.2.b

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2.b— Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

W.9-10.2.c

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2.c— Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.9-10.3

Writing Standards

W.9-10.3— Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.9-10.3.a

Writing Standards

W.9-10.3.a— Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.9-10.3.b

Writing Standards

W.9-10.3.b— Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.9-10.3.c

Writing Standards

W.9-10.3.c— Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.

W.9-10.3.d

Writing Standards

W.9-10.3.d— Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.9-10.4

Writing Standards

W.9-10.4— Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.9-10.5

Writing Standards

W.9-10.5— Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

W.9-10.6

Writing Standards

W.9-10.6— Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

W.9-10.7

Writing Standards

W.9-10.7— Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

W.9-10.8

Writing Standards

W.9-10.8— Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

W.9-10.9

Writing Standards

W.9-10.9— Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.10

Writing Standards

W.9-10.10— Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Supporting Standards

Standards that are practiced daily but are not priority standards of the unit

L.9-10.1

Language Standards

L.9-10.1— Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.9-10.2

Language Standards

L.9-10.2— Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.9-10.3

Language Standards

L.9-10.3— Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.9-10.6

Language Standards

L.9-10.6— Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

RI.9-10.1

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.1— Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.9-10.2

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.2— Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.4

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.4— Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

RI.9-10.5

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.5— Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

RI.9-10.8

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.8— Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

RI.9-10.10

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.10— By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.<br />By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 9—10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

RL.9-10.1

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.1— Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.9-10.10

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.10— By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.<br />By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9—10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

SL.9-10.1

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1— Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9—10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.6

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.6— Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

W.9-10.2.d

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2.d— Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

W.9-10.2.e

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2.e— Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.9-10.3

Writing Standards

W.9-10.3— Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.9-10.3.e

Writing Standards

W.9-10.3.e— Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

W.9-10.4

Writing Standards

W.9-10.4— Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.9-10.5

Writing Standards

W.9-10.5— Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

W.9-10.6

Writing Standards

W.9-10.6— Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

W.9-10.7

Writing Standards

W.9-10.7— Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

W.9-10.8

Writing Standards

W.9-10.8— Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

W.9-10.9

Writing Standards

W.9-10.9— Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9-10.9.a

Writing Standards

W.9-10.9.a— Apply grades 9—10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").

W.9-10.9.b

Writing Standards

W.9-10.9.b— Apply grades 9—10 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").

W.9-10.10

Writing Standards

W.9-10.10— Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Unit 4

Home, Grief, and Storytelling in Men We Reaped

10th Grade English | Reading as Resistance: <em>Reading Lolita in Tehran</em> | Free Lesson Plans (2024)
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